September 5, 2007 (REAL Women of Canada via LifeSiteNews.com) – A provincial election will be held in Ontario on October 10, 2007. On election day, there will be two ballots handed to the voters. One will be to choose a candidate for the riding. The other ballot will be to ask the voter to respond to a referendum question on a new voting method proposed for the province.

As important as the election is to determine who will represent the riding for the next four years, perhaps the referendum question is of even greater importance because of its lasting impact on democracy…

This voting system will produce two classes of politicians: those elected by the voters (90 MPP’s) and those appointed by the political parties (39 MPPs). That is, the 129 seats in the Ontario legislature will be divided between those elected by the 90 individual ridings, and 39 seats chosen by the political parties themselves, according to the percentage of votes each party obtains in the election. Those appointed by the parties will obviously adhere to the party’s ideology because their appointment will be dependent on it. Consequently, these MPPs will not be interested in the views of the public or any of the public’s lobbying efforts: such concerns will be irrelevant to them as their role will be to support their party’s policies only…

The greatest beneficiaries of the MMP system, apart from the small parties, will be those from special interest groups, such as feminists, as the major parties will certainly place them at the top of their list for appointments. This is because feminist activists have constantly bemoaned the lack of “women” in the legislature, despite the fact that women are all different and have no commonality of experience. It is significant that it is not the gender of a candidate that matters to the male or female voters, but rather, his/her values and perspective on issues.

More… (source)

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